About SC Advisors – Orlando, Florida Real Estate Advisory Company

The SC in our name stands for Shingle Creek, the banks of which were home to Founder Jay Berlinsky’s ancestors. The hard work, integrity and desire to build a community exhibited by those pioneers are among the core values that drive our company today.

SC Advisors is relationship-driven. We partner with each of our clients to fully understand their objectives and then bring our 100 plus years of collective development, transaction and project management experience to meet those objectives. With over $2 billion dollars in development projects completed and over $200 million in active assignments we are able to offer our clients the seasoned and practical operating expertise needed to approach large and complex projects and bring them to successful completion on time and within budget.

Our core disciplines include:

  • Real Estate – extensive market knowledge and investment grade feasibility and transaction services
  • Development – integrated property development services in all product classes
  • Owner’s Representation – performance driven project management in both public and private sectors and in public/private partnerships

MEET OUR TEAM

JAY BERLINSKY

Founder and Owner

NINA DEMARTINO

Director of Design and Construction

ANDY SWADEL

Director of Development

BRENT DAUBACH

Senior Project Manager

SUSAN KANE

Broker-Associate, Project and Transaction Coordinator

KATHY BERLINSKY

Director of Finance and Administration

Hawkfield Gallery Consultants Review – The Art Journey of Sally Caverly

 

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Sally Caverly grows up in a home full of art. During her teen years, she was task and trained to serve as an auctioneer for her parent’s American impressionist artwork collection. Her keen taste for art was developed as she learned to appreciate the beauty of nature, of wildlife, and of the stunning scenery of the Lakes Region of New Hampshire.

During her twenties, Sally bought an art work of William Henry Chandler – an American pastel artist popular in his own time. The pastel drawing of wild ducks of this artist was the first in Sally’s massive collection. Her love of collecting art was developed due to her exposure in the art world with parents who are both artists. Sally’s collection consists mostly of paintings and sculpture of geese, ducks and other wild birds and animals.

Sally Caverly obtained a degree in Bachelor of Arts in Marketing from Simmons College and holds a Master’s degree in Education. She is currently serving as Director at the North and South Rivers Watershed Association after working as Market Research Department Head at Houghton Mifflin Company.

Her love of art is very notable as she even travels to engage in different art shows and auctions as well as visiting the home of many reputable art collectors. Sally’s knowledge and vast experience in the art marketplace significantly contributed to the operation of Hawkfield Gallery. Sally with her expertise together with her trusted fine arts consultants has successfully maintained quality service and assistance to many satisfied art buyers and collectors.

Hawkfield Gallery Consultants Review – A Home Filled with Art

Honestly, I am envious of people who grew up surrounded by art. It surely is different and a privilege to be exposed in such environment. This is why I envy with Sally Caverly, the owner and curator of Hawkfield Gallery. Her parents are both artists and growing up in a home filled with arts makes her appreciate the value of it even more, making her at home in art. During the years, she had grown to recognize the value of preserving impressive artworks made by different artists.

Sally first started her collection during her twenties where she fortunately acquired an artwork from the famous American pastel artist William Henry Chandler. And as I noticed, Sally has this love on artworks with birds, geese, ducks and wild animals which are evident on her collective artworks. This is maybe because of her attachment to her home environment in the East Coast. Her knowledge and keen taste in art developed as she learned to appreciate the beauty of nature and the breathtaking landscapes of her home environment.

Her passion for art is very strong considering that she even travels to participate in many art shows and sales. She even visits art museums and the homes of many reputable private collectors. The knowledge and experience she gained on her life journeys enormously contributed in preserving the charisma of Hawkfield Gallery in Massachusetts. With the help of her trusted fine arts consultants, Sally has maintained quality service and assistance to many satisfied art buyers and collectors.

Background

Sally Caverly holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Marketing from Simmons College and a diploma from Phillips Academy in Andover. In addition, she also holds a Master’s degree in Education. She worked as a Market Research Department Head at Houghton Mifflin Company and now serves as a Director at the North and South Rivers Watershed Association.

Quote to live by:

“There is no such thing as teaching a person anything. You may be helped toward learning by a hint someone has given you, but anything you really learn has got to be learned by experience.” ~Frank Benson

Online Security: A shoe e-retailer takes steps to improve its fraud detection

Fast-growing Schutz Shoes upgrades its fraud detection software to slash manual reviews and improve order processing.

Online orders were flowing into shoe e-retailer Schutz Shoes, the U.S. division of Brazilian-based shoe retailer Arezzo & Co., but the small team spent an increasing amount of time checking whether an order was fraudulent. When one employee on a staff of seven has to manually review the legitimacy of an online order, that’s time away from customers and other business, says Kimberly Gort, e-commerce manager for Schutz.

Schutz Shoes started selling online in 2014 operating its e-commerce site in the basement of its New York City store. That first year, Schutz had about $350,000 in online sales. In 2015, about half of its product catalog was available online and sales grew to $1.5 million. Now, with all of its products available online, Schutz Shoes projects about $3 million in online sales for 2016, Gort says. The retailer also opened a store in Los Angeles.

With triple-digit percentage growth comes growing pains. When the e-retailer received a modest five online orders a day, using the free tool from its e-commerce platform provider (Shopify Inc.) worked fine, Gort says. The plugin would flag orders that might be fraudulent, and the retailer decided to approve or decline such orders.  For example, the tool flagged an order if the credit card and shipping addresses didn’t match, so a Schutz employee had to call the customer and determine if it was a legitimate order. Deciding what was and wasn’t fraudulent often was difficult, Gort says.

“There’s always a risk,” she says. “It was like we were playing roulette.”

The situation frustrated the retailer and the shopper, as some shoppers were blocked from placing an order or their order was delayed or they had to deal with a phone call from the retailer. Schutz was missing out on orders, devoting almost a full employee to manually check the orders and seek out consumers to verify information. As order volume and sales grew, the manual-review model no longer worked, Gort says.

In July, Schutz Shoes decided to integrate fraud detection software provider ClearSale onto its platform, choosing the vendor because it was used by parent company Arezzo. It took about two weeks to integrate the technology onto Schutz’s site, Gort says.

ClearSale factors in about 100 variables to approve or deny orders, and then has its 500-person team to dig deeper on flagged orders, says Rafael Lourenco, vice president of operations at ClearSale. Orders can be approved within three seconds, while an order that requires manual review will take 24-48 hours, he says.

The impact of adding ClearSale was almost immediate, Gort says, as Schutz Shoes was no longer on the hook to manually check flagged orders. The e-retailer now approves 94-96% of its orders, which is about a 5% increase from when it relied on its free plugin, Gort says.

ClearSale charges per transaction and takes a 0.4-1.5% cut of the sale. The commission is worth it, Gort says, as more sales are approved. In August, Schutz Shoes paid ClearSale $1,500. The retailer processed 1,200 online orders that month, 1,002 of which ClearSale reviewed in some capacity; of those 1,002 orders, 973 (97.1%) were approved.

ClearSale has about 2,000 clients, and more than 90% are retailers, Lourenco says. Across all of its clients, 93.5% of orders are automatically approved, Lourenco says.

Recently, ClearSale updated its formula with another variable to approve or deny orders. The feature factors in how long a consumer is on the website before she purchases. The shorter it is, the more suspect. However, this is only one variable and a short time between landings on the site and purchasing will not automatically flag an order, Lourenco says. The new feature increased ClearSale’s average approval rate by 1%, he says.

Pacific Associates Limited Minato-ku Tokyo Japan, Recruiting in Tokyo is my life’s work

I have been in the recruiting industry in Tokyo since graduating business-school at the end of the ’80s. Growing up in Chicago in the ’60s and high-school there in the ’70s, the thought of moving to California and graduating from U.C. San Diego (Economics) would have seemed a dream. Leaving for London with a duffle-bag on graduation-day and never coming back certainly would have seemed the things of fantasy, but if one follows their heart good things can happen. Thus it was I arrived, in due-course, in Japan in 1985. The opportunities and dignity of the place have kept me here ever since.

paul-a-levine

The opportunity to help professional (people to whom career is vitally important) find a path to a better life via proactive career building is, in my opinion, an honorable undertaking. That it can be done in the elegant way of Japan, where each placement we do is ‘hand-made’ after intensive in-person discussion with our candidates and clients has led me to dedicate my life to this work. An important goal of mine has long been to be a master-craftsman in the art of recruiting. To this end I am still meeting candidates and clients to further develop my art.

K.K. Pacific Associates Limited

President, Paul A. Levine

President Bio & History

In 1998 I made the decision to move my own career forward from being a senior recruiter who happens to own a head-hunting company to being a full-time president who happens to be expert in recruiting. Though the difference may sound pedantic or rhetorical, the day-by-day reality is quite different. The bottom line is that from the time of making this transition, my company at that time Access Technology Japan, grew from roughly 10 staff to 189 with operations in four countries in the space of three years. Further evolving, in 2004 I changed my role to Chairman, appointing one of my long-term managers as President. This facilitated the sale of that company in 2007; the largest such deal in the Tokyo recruiting-market up to that point.

My goal then was to discover life beyond that of 12+hours days and enjoy the life of the early-retired. This allowed time with my family, work my limited abilities in photography, enjoy travel and compete more often in power-lifting.

Like a pleasant afternoon nap that comes to a refreshing end, my time in retirement came to a happy finish with my establishment of Pacific Associates Limited in 2010. Pacific Associates Limited (PAL) is established as a partnership rather than sole-proprietorship. The difference is huge: my current professional objective, beyond growing my skills as in pursuit of being a master-craftsman in recruiting, is to lead my partners to be presidents. As far as I know, in the Tokyo recruiting market there has not yet been a company dedicated to helping its staff to leave the company by becoming, first a partner and then president of a separate company.

Paul Levine’s Profile

Paul Levine first visited Japan in 1985. He got an MBA at the University of San Diego and the California State University in 1989, and in the same year, came back to Japan to be a headhunter. In 1992, he established Access Technology Japan; the very first Japanese headhunting company specialized in the high-tech industry. He obtained a master’s degree in business administration at Harvard University in 2007. He established K.K. Pacific Associates Limited in February 2010, and continues to expand the company to new heights every day.

He has been married with two children. He loves bourbon, photograph taking and weightlifting and his skills in both fields are semi-professional. He is still active in the weightlifting field, winning first prize at a tournament in Tokyo. He still works out twice a day, coached by Chuck Wilson, his friend for over 10 years.

His trademark white shirt, red tie and red suspenders have been prominent since 1995. “I meet different candidates in the same meeting room, dressed in the same clothes. Staying consistent really helps you to concentrate on the people you meet. As a professional in judging people, “I can understand an individual within about five minutes of speaking with them”.

Heimdal Online Security – 15 Steps to Maximize your Financial Data Protection

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We use computers to pay bills, shop online, chat and even keep in touch with friends on social media platforms. You might not realize it, but this makes us vulnerable.

Because we willingly broadcast over the Internet valuable details, such as our credit card information or bank account credentials – information usually needed by cyber criminals – we can never be too careful when securing our financial transactions or personal information.

A 2016 report from the PricewaterhouseCoopers indicates that cybercrime is the “2nd most reported economic crime, affecting 32% of organizations.” And the same study reveals another cause for concern, apart from the economic impact:

“The insidious nature of this threat is such that of the 56% who say they are not victims, many have likely been compromised without knowing it.”

The data clearly shows that cybercrime affects individuals and global economic growth. Cyber-attacks on financial institutions or with financial consequences for users like you and me are putting financial assets at risk. Consequently, financial data protection should be a strong concern for anyone.

So is there a way to for our online activities to remain private and safe from cybercriminals?

Definitely! Here are a few best practices that will keep your system protected:

  1. Check the link before you click it

Pay attention to the links you want to access. To make sure you are not deceived; simply hover the mouse cursor over the link to see if you are directed to a legitimate location.

If you were supposed to reach your favorite news website, such as “www.cnn.com”, but the link indicates “hfieo88.net“, then you should resist the urge of clicking the link. Hyperlinking is a common practice in phishing attacks and it’s always best to double check embedded URLs.

Most of us use shortening services for their links, such as goo.gl or tinyurl. But in some cases an unknown link may send you to a malicious site that can install malware on the system. So, how can you know where you’ll arrive if you click it?

To make sure you are about to access the right online destination, use a free tool such as Redirect Detective. This tool will allow you to see the complete path of a redirected link.

Alternatively, you can also check the suspicious links using a reliable URL checker, such as VirusTotal.

  1. Check the file before you click it

We all know malware is everywhere. But how can we make sure a file (or an executable file) we just downloaded is what it’s pretending to be? Can we tell the difference between a safe file and a malicious one?

An important step for everyone is to use a browser which integrates a reputation-based technology. This technology uses a cloud scoring system to analyze each application downloaded and where it comes from. As a result of the analysis, websites that distribute malicious software – not yet detected by existing defense mechanisms – are more easily blocked. For more details, you can access the following article.

To make sure you are not running a malicious executable file (which may download a Trojan virus on your system), use VirusTotal, which analyzes suspicious files on multiple antivirus solutions.

  1. Use secure websites to run financial transactions

Financial operations and transactions should be given high scrutiny, as they hold the key for cyber criminals to cashing out your life’s savings.

Here’s how to make sure you visit a secure website:

  1. Look to the left of the web address and find the “Lock” icon. This indicates that you are visiting an encrypted and/or a verified website.
  2. Make sure the web address starts with “https://”. The “s” comes from “secure socket layer” and it indicates you are connected to a website where data, which is sent and received, is encrypted.
  3. Set strong passwords for your accounts

Your passwords should contain around 20 characters. Don’t forget to combine upper and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols. Don’t use the same password for all your accounts. Make a habit of changing your main passwords every 30 days. Even if you are hacked, having different passwords for each account will help you limit a potential loss.

For more information on how to set strong passwords and manage them safely, see our step by step guide on password security. This includes details on how to use a strong and secure password manager like LastPass or Sticky Password.

  1. Use two-factor authentication

This is one of the best ways to ensure your online accounts or your email inbox are not accessed by anyone else but you.

This option means that, besides entering your credentials, you will be required to enter a one-time code sent to your phone. Use this method to protect confidential information from social media accounts, such as Facebook, Twitter or valuable data from email accounts.

Read More About 15 Steps to Maximize your Financial Data Protection

 

IOSCO issues final statement on non-GAAP financial measures

The International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) has finalised its guidance setting out IOSCO’s expectations for issuers with respect to the presentation of financial measures other than those prescribed by Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), so called ‘non-GAAP financial measures’.

The IOSCO guidance is contained in the Statement on Non-GAAP Financial Measures, which sets out IOSCO’s expectations for the presentation of such measures by issuers, including that sufficient information should accompanying non-GAAP financial measures to aid in their understanding and that the measures should be presented transparently and with disclosure of how they are calculated.

The statement provides specific expectations in the following broad categories:

Defining the non-GAAP financial measure. This encompasses providing a clear explanation of the basis of calculation, clearly labelling measures such that they are distinguished from GAAP measures, explaining why the measures are useful, and explicitly stating the non-GAAP measure does not have a standardised meaning and may not be comparable between entities.

Unbiased purpose. This requires that non-GAAP financial measures should not be used to avoid presenting adverse information to the market.

Prominence of GAAP measures versus non-GAAP financial measuress. Non-GAAP measures and their most directly comparable GAAP measures should be presented with equal prominence, or the GAAP measure given greater prominence, and non-GAAP measures should not in any way confuse or obscure the presentation of GAAP measures.

Reconciliation to comparable GAAP measures. Reconciliations should be provided between non-GAAP financial measures and their most directly comparable GAAP measure presented in the financial statements, with adjustments explained and reconcilable to the financial statements or information about how they are calculated provided.

Presentation of non-GAAP financial measures consistently over time. Measures should generally remain consistent from period to period, include comparative information, with any changes in composition explained and also reflected in comparative information and discontinued use of a non-GAAP measure sufficiently motivated.

Recurring items. Items that are reasonably likely to affect past and future periods, such as restructuring costs and impairment losses, should not be described as non-recurring, infrequent or unusual.

Access to associated information. The information that issuers provide regarding non-GAAP financial measures should be readily and easily accessible to third parties.

The statement is intended to be used by entities applying International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) and other accounting principles.