Hawkfield Gallery Consultants Review – The Art Journey of Sally Caverly

 

hawkfield-gallery-consultants-review-the-art-journey-of-sally-caverly

 

Sally Caverly grows up in a home full of art. During her teen years, she was task and trained to serve as an auctioneer for her parent’s American impressionist artwork collection. Her keen taste for art was developed as she learned to appreciate the beauty of nature, of wildlife, and of the stunning scenery of the Lakes Region of New Hampshire.

During her twenties, Sally bought an art work of William Henry Chandler – an American pastel artist popular in his own time. The pastel drawing of wild ducks of this artist was the first in Sally’s massive collection. Her love of collecting art was developed due to her exposure in the art world with parents who are both artists. Sally’s collection consists mostly of paintings and sculpture of geese, ducks and other wild birds and animals.

Sally Caverly obtained a degree in Bachelor of Arts in Marketing from Simmons College and holds a Master’s degree in Education. She is currently serving as Director at the North and South Rivers Watershed Association after working as Market Research Department Head at Houghton Mifflin Company.

Her love of art is very notable as she even travels to engage in different art shows and auctions as well as visiting the home of many reputable art collectors. Sally’s knowledge and vast experience in the art marketplace significantly contributed to the operation of Hawkfield Gallery. Sally with her expertise together with her trusted fine arts consultants has successfully maintained quality service and assistance to many satisfied art buyers and collectors.

Hawkfield Gallery Consultants Review – A Home Filled with Art

Honestly, I am envious of people who grew up surrounded by art. It surely is different and a privilege to be exposed in such environment. This is why I envy with Sally Caverly, the owner and curator of Hawkfield Gallery. Her parents are both artists and growing up in a home filled with arts makes her appreciate the value of it even more, making her at home in art. During the years, she had grown to recognize the value of preserving impressive artworks made by different artists.

Sally first started her collection during her twenties where she fortunately acquired an artwork from the famous American pastel artist William Henry Chandler. And as I noticed, Sally has this love on artworks with birds, geese, ducks and wild animals which are evident on her collective artworks. This is maybe because of her attachment to her home environment in the East Coast. Her knowledge and keen taste in art developed as she learned to appreciate the beauty of nature and the breathtaking landscapes of her home environment.

Her passion for art is very strong considering that she even travels to participate in many art shows and sales. She even visits art museums and the homes of many reputable private collectors. The knowledge and experience she gained on her life journeys enormously contributed in preserving the charisma of Hawkfield Gallery in Massachusetts. With the help of her trusted fine arts consultants, Sally has maintained quality service and assistance to many satisfied art buyers and collectors.

Background

Sally Caverly holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Marketing from Simmons College and a diploma from Phillips Academy in Andover. In addition, she also holds a Master’s degree in Education. She worked as a Market Research Department Head at Houghton Mifflin Company and now serves as a Director at the North and South Rivers Watershed Association.

Quote to live by:

“There is no such thing as teaching a person anything. You may be helped toward learning by a hint someone has given you, but anything you really learn has got to be learned by experience.” ~Frank Benson

Online Security: A shoe e-retailer takes steps to improve its fraud detection

Fast-growing Schutz Shoes upgrades its fraud detection software to slash manual reviews and improve order processing.

Online orders were flowing into shoe e-retailer Schutz Shoes, the U.S. division of Brazilian-based shoe retailer Arezzo & Co., but the small team spent an increasing amount of time checking whether an order was fraudulent. When one employee on a staff of seven has to manually review the legitimacy of an online order, that’s time away from customers and other business, says Kimberly Gort, e-commerce manager for Schutz.

Schutz Shoes started selling online in 2014 operating its e-commerce site in the basement of its New York City store. That first year, Schutz had about $350,000 in online sales. In 2015, about half of its product catalog was available online and sales grew to $1.5 million. Now, with all of its products available online, Schutz Shoes projects about $3 million in online sales for 2016, Gort says. The retailer also opened a store in Los Angeles.

With triple-digit percentage growth comes growing pains. When the e-retailer received a modest five online orders a day, using the free tool from its e-commerce platform provider (Shopify Inc.) worked fine, Gort says. The plugin would flag orders that might be fraudulent, and the retailer decided to approve or decline such orders.  For example, the tool flagged an order if the credit card and shipping addresses didn’t match, so a Schutz employee had to call the customer and determine if it was a legitimate order. Deciding what was and wasn’t fraudulent often was difficult, Gort says.

“There’s always a risk,” she says. “It was like we were playing roulette.”

The situation frustrated the retailer and the shopper, as some shoppers were blocked from placing an order or their order was delayed or they had to deal with a phone call from the retailer. Schutz was missing out on orders, devoting almost a full employee to manually check the orders and seek out consumers to verify information. As order volume and sales grew, the manual-review model no longer worked, Gort says.

In July, Schutz Shoes decided to integrate fraud detection software provider ClearSale onto its platform, choosing the vendor because it was used by parent company Arezzo. It took about two weeks to integrate the technology onto Schutz’s site, Gort says.

ClearSale factors in about 100 variables to approve or deny orders, and then has its 500-person team to dig deeper on flagged orders, says Rafael Lourenco, vice president of operations at ClearSale. Orders can be approved within three seconds, while an order that requires manual review will take 24-48 hours, he says.

The impact of adding ClearSale was almost immediate, Gort says, as Schutz Shoes was no longer on the hook to manually check flagged orders. The e-retailer now approves 94-96% of its orders, which is about a 5% increase from when it relied on its free plugin, Gort says.

ClearSale charges per transaction and takes a 0.4-1.5% cut of the sale. The commission is worth it, Gort says, as more sales are approved. In August, Schutz Shoes paid ClearSale $1,500. The retailer processed 1,200 online orders that month, 1,002 of which ClearSale reviewed in some capacity; of those 1,002 orders, 973 (97.1%) were approved.

ClearSale has about 2,000 clients, and more than 90% are retailers, Lourenco says. Across all of its clients, 93.5% of orders are automatically approved, Lourenco says.

Recently, ClearSale updated its formula with another variable to approve or deny orders. The feature factors in how long a consumer is on the website before she purchases. The shorter it is, the more suspect. However, this is only one variable and a short time between landings on the site and purchasing will not automatically flag an order, Lourenco says. The new feature increased ClearSale’s average approval rate by 1%, he says.